Welcome to Knight Inlet Grizzly Bear Adventure Tours at Knight Inlet Lodge in British Columbia, Canada. Enjoy one of the premier grizzly bear viewing spots in the world, set amidst the snow-capped peaks of Canada's rugged coastline.

Pauline and Ian’s second visit to Knight Inlet Lodge

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011
grizzly bears at Knight Inlet Lodge

grizzly bears

PAULINE & IAN ANDERSON, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 2010.

It was with great excitement that we looked forward to our return visit to Knight Inlet in October last year. Having enjoyed “The Grizzly Bear Adventure” with Titan HiTours 2 years earlier we booked the same tour, this time extending our stay at the lodge by an extra 2 nights – what indulgence!

Knowing what to expect did not detract from our anticipation &, as in 2008, we had a truly wonderful time. It was like going to visit old friends – indeed we were recognised by some of the guides & staff (rather worrying!!).

The weather was very different this time – dull & raining almost every day. Did it matter? Certainly not – we were comfortably togged-up in our orange suits & under cover mostly. The Rainforest Walk was rather wet but, nonetheless, thoroughly enjoyable.

The Whale Watching day trip was excellent – the only one of the 5 days when the sun shone & it was beautifully calm on the Johnstone Straits, thankfully. We saw a number of Humpbacks & several very vocal sealions but the pod of Killer Whales was elusive despite the best efforts of our 3 guides.

humpback whale seen on Knight Inlet Lodge marine tour

humpback whale

The main attraction of the holiday was, of course, the Grizzlies. I could quite happily stay at the viewing stands all day watching the bears while they fished the waters & ate their catch, or just lazed on the banks. Twice we were entertained by a sow & one of her twins rubbing against a tree just a few metres away from us. I almost wore out my camera battery during one episode! The 2 year old “white” cub put in a couple of appearances with its sibling & mother. They never came too close, seeming rather timid, whereas some others were as intent on watching us as we were on watching them.

white grizzly cub at Knight Inlet Lodge

white grizzly cub

Our guides were all excellent – very helpful & friendly, knowledgable & multi talented. The evening interpretive talks in the warmth & comfort of the lounge were very interesting & entertaining, & all of the meals & snacks were first class.

grizzly bear fishing for salmon

grizzly bear fishing for salmon

Knight Inlet Lodge certainly has our vote for “Top Holiday Destination in the World”. I see previously on the blog that one lucky traveller has visited 3 times – we can’t be outdone & are saving hard for another trip!

Grizzly bear blog by Knight Inlet Lodge guest

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

This story was posted by Knight Inlet Lodge guest Yvonne J. Thank you Yvonne!

grizzly bear on bus

grizzly bear on bus

In September 2010 we stayed in Knight Inlet Lodge. A trip down to paradise! We had the time of our lives. We experienced some great bear viewing. What a thrill to see the bears in their natural habitat. Chasing and feeding on salmon, bears walking down under the viewing platform, but the icing on the cake was when one bear jumped up on the car! Talking about close encounters! The bear was very interested in the window wipes and was not impressed when the guides tried to chase her away, afraid she would might wreck the car. She didn’t wreck anything, but she sure put on a great show! The whole trip was an experience of a lifetime! The flight down there, the lodge, the staff and the great bear viewings made a big impression I will never forget!

grizzly bear on bus

grizzly bear on bus

In the presence of grizzly bears, a Knight Inlet Lodge guide’s story

Wednesday, June 9th, 2010

In the presence of bears
Water laps at the edges of the boat as the tide ebbs, the comforting, familiar sound of the Glendale River adds perfect a background to the scene before us.  I’m standing in the water knee-deep, holding onto my boatload of British tourists stationary in the river, keeping our position between Luke’s boat upstream and Shawn’s boat downstream. Our three boats float quietly together, all of us focused on the creature standing on the opposite riverbank. We’re watching a beautiful sub-adult female grizzly bear named Bonnie go about her business as if we weren’t there at all.

The sights and sounds can almost overwhelm the senses here some days, but this morning is calm and quiet; rain is softly falling in Glendale Cove, onto Bonnie and her viewers on this slightly soggy spring morning. All we can hear is distant bird song from the forest, the occasional bald eagle that flies over, calling out to us as it goes, camera shutters snapping away and Bonnie’s contented munching on the estuary sedge grass.

We sit quietly, the enthralled viewers barely moving a muscle as this little grizzly allows us to join her for breakfast. Bonnie tears off mouthful after mouthful of the sedge grass, occasionally flicking her intelligent brown eyes towards us, making sure we’re behaving ourselves. She pads almost silently through the long grass, out onto the stones of the riverbank and sits down, nose high in the air, reading the messages on the breeze.

The tide is quickly retreating from the river now, and reluctantly Luke, Shawn and I pull ourselves and our guests away from the beautiful little bear and start heading down river.  My guests make remarks about how they can’t believe we sat silently and watched her for almost half an hour, but then again it’s always surprising how fast the time goes in the presence of bears.

They know no concept of time as humans do – it’s meal time when they’re hungry and the tide is right, it’s play time when they feel playful and it’s nap time when they’re tired. Spring and summer for the bears are spent fattening up and possibly finding a mate when the time is right; fall is all about eating as many salmon brains and eggs as possible and winter is for hibernation. When they wake up the following spring, they awake as a slimmer, older and wiser version of their former selves.
At least one species of British Columbians have it figured out…

I’m back up here for my second season as a guide at Knight Inlet Lodge, and as always, Glendale Cove and all its inhabitants never cease to amaze. In my first 10-day shift of the season I’ve seen eight different grizzly bears, a handful of black bears, the rear end of a fast-retreating wolf, four transient killer whales, almost a hundred dolphins and on my last day of the shift, was lucky enough to find two humpback whales bubble feeding just outside of the cove – a rare sighting up here.

Rain or shine it’s beautiful here – this place enchants the people that visit with the birds and the beasts, the mountains, the ocean and the rainforest itself. I consider myself to be entirely addicted.
Words can’t do it justice – you’ll just have to come and see for yourselves.
Looking forwards to seeing you on the dock.
Moira

Knight Inlet History

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

One of the things I enjoy the most about my job with Knight Inlet Lodge is all the interesting people that I get to meet. Now I say meet but what I really mean is correspond with as very rarely do I get to meet them face to face.

Recently I had the pleasure to “meet” a gentleman who worked as a timber cruiser in Knight Inlet during the mid to late 1950’s. Alan first contacted me to purchase one of our “stop the hunt” wrist bands mentioning that he had worked in Knight Inlet. He told me how they found that the grizzlies became used to their presence after a few weeks and would avoid the crew, they knew there were lots of bears around from the bear scat etc, but they would rarely see a grizzly. After awhile the crew stopped carrying firearms to work as they no longer felt threatened by the grizzlies.  I found this unsolicited comment very interesting as it so closely mirrors what we find with the grizzly bears of Glendale Cove today. The fact that they regularly used the grizzly bears trails to travel in the forest gives you an idea as to their comfort level. As Alan commented the crew quickly figured out that the grizzlies knew the easiest way through the forest.

Alan is also the first person I have ever met that knew Jim & Loretta Stanton, well known Knight Inlet pioneers whose experiences were chronicled in the book “Grizzlies in my backyard”. Alan remembers Jim Stanton claiming that he could recognize the individual bears of Knight Inlet by sight, a most impressive ability to say the least.

All in all it has been an interesting couple of weeks learning some real first hand history of Knight Inlet. Alan has kindly consented to my sharing this information in a blog, hopefully with more to follow.

Grizzly Bears and Elephants?

Friday, January 8th, 2010

Knight Inlet Lodge is pleased to announce an exciting new partnership between itself and and African wildlife experts Norman Carr Safaris. This innovative partnership will include guide exchanges, co-operative marketing and many other unique ideas we will be announcing as we finalize them. Watch our blog for stories on the guide exchange and the partnership over the next few months.

Andy & Olwyn’s Knight Inlet Lodge blog

Friday, November 20th, 2009
Knight Inlet grizzly bear

Knight Inlet grizzly bear

Following a recommendation from our daughter and son-in-law who honeymooned at Knight Inlet September 2007, we booked a few days there ourselves September 2009 as part of our long time planned Canadian “holiday of a lifetime”. Our two days at Knight Inlet definitely warranted what we found to be a somewhat typical Canadian word “AWESOME”. Of the four weeks we spent in Canada from Niagra via Icefield Parkway, Rocky Mountain Train and Vancouver island, our time at Knight Inlet was certainly the highlight our daughter promised !!

Grizzly sow with cubs

Grizzly sow with cubs

We saw bears, seals, otters, bald eagles, kingfishers to name but a few…. The whole experience was made even more memorable by the knowledge, understanding and friendliness of the guides – in our case specificaly Bob, Dean and Luke (a fellow Yorskhsire man!) and we still groan at the memory of some of Deans’ “jokes”.

Knight Inlet certainly deserves its reputation – our only one “problem” was to try and avoid eating too much of the delcicious food provided !!

We wish you all the best and look forward to seeing you again in the future, possibly in three years as we return to see the Coho my wife helped release as they return for spawning.

grizzly bear eating salmon

grizzly bear eating salmon

grizzly fishing for salmon at weir stand

grizzly fishing for salmon at weir stand