Welcome to Knight Inlet Grizzly Bear Adventure Tours at Knight Inlet Lodge in British Columbia, Canada. Enjoy one of the premier grizzly bear viewing spots in the world, set amidst the snow-capped peaks of Canada's rugged coastline.

Glendale grizzly bear research update

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

The research project in Glendale Cove that Mel Clapham is running has captured photos of a new grizzly male. Mel has been able to identify him as a returning male from a couple of years ago since he has a distinctive piece of his nose missing. Nicknamed Diablo by our staff the first time he appeared it will be interesting to see how long he stays in our area. The photos in this blog are of another of our grizzly males with the rather fancy nickname of Pretty Boy. The photos are from one of Mel’s research cameras, we appreciate her sharing them with us.

male grizzly glendale cove

Pretty Boy, Glendale Cove grizzly

male grizzly bear knight inlet british columbia

Pretty Boy

Grizzly Bear Research

Thursday, June 9th, 2011

Grizzly Bear Research in Glendale Cove

Some of you who have visited the lodge in the past three years may have met me during your stay. My name is Melanie Clapham and I have been conducting research out of Knight Inlet Lodge since 2009. My research is looking into how grizzly bears communicate with each other using their sense of smell. This forms the basis of my whole PhD project, of which I am now in my final year. My project is co-funded by Knight Inlet Lodge and the University of Cumbria in the UK. This is where I am based during the winter months, analysing the data I have collected in the previous summer/fall, and writing up my findings. I am now back at the lodge conducting my final field season, and will be here until October. When I am here my days are usually spent searching the estuary for bears, and out in the forest maintaining my trail cameras. These heat and motion-sensitive cameras are the main method of data collection I am using. By placing these cameras facing bear ‘marking trees’ (or ‘rub trees’ as they’re known), I am able to monitor natural scent marking behaviour by different individuals in the population. This way I am also able to assess whether its adult males which seem to be communicating, or adult females, or subadults, and so on. I am also looking at which individuals investigate the scent marks of others, but don’t actually mark on trees themselves. By conducting this data collection between May and October, I can assess how marking behaviour changes during different seasons i.e. the breeding and non-breeding season.

In addition to looking at the social function of scent marking, I have also been documenting the trees which bears mark on. Focusing on what we call ‘traditionally used trees’ which are trees marked on by different bears over many generations, I am looking at whether it is the species, the size, or the location of the tree which makes it favourable to be marked on over others. I believe this is key to explaining the use of trees for scent marking by bears, rather them just been used to relieve an itch. It seems that the selection of these trees is much more structured. So by studying differences in marking behaviour by different age and sex classes, and analysing the trees which bears use to mark on, we are beginning to fit different pieces of the puzzle together in understanding the complexities of chemical communication in grizzly bears.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Dean Wyatt and all the staff at Knight Inlet Lodge for their continued support and field assistance throughout this whole project.

Melanie Clapham

PhD Candidate

University of Cumbria

grizzly bear rub tree

Grizzly bear rub tree

grizzly bear rub tree glendale cove

Grizzly bear marking tree

Knight Inlet Lodge newsletter now online

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

The latest Knight Inlet Lodge newsletter is now online. This link will take you directly to it . In the latest issue are photos of grizzly bears, stories on our 2010 grizzly bear viewing season and links to videos filmed by guests. Be sure to sign up for future issues while you are there.

The first Grizzly bears of 2010 spotted

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

Knight Inlet Lodge is excited to announce that we have had our first grizzly bear sighting of 2010. Tuesday, April 27 saw “peanut” and is mom return to Glendale Cove after a long winters nap. Enjoy these photos taken by Knight Inlet Lodge guide Luke Denbigh. spring is truly here at last! The photos were taken in the Glendale Cove estuary, Knight Inlet, British Columbia.

grizzly mom and cub, first bears of 2010

grizzly mom and cub, first bears of 2010

grizzly sow at Knight Inlet Lodge. the first bear to appear in 2010

grizzly sow at Knight Inlet Lodge. the first bear to appear in 2010

Knight Inlet Lodge and Vancouver Island Air

Friday, April 9th, 2010
scenic view from Vancouver Island Air floatplane

scenic view from Vancouver Island Air floatplane

Vancouver Island Air has had the privilege of serving Knight Inlet Lodge since 1998. Ours floatplanes transport guests to Glendale Cove from around the world daily from May to October. Over two thousand guests a year fly in to view the Grizzly Bears and enjoy the many adventures and fine cuisine. Our inquiries as to their experience on the return flight are always met with high praise and excitement for the entire trip. We all enjoy hearing how many bears were spotted or other amazing wildlife, and even sometimes get to see some amazing photos!

DeHavilland Beaver

DeHavilland Beaver

Photos from guests of Knight Inlet Lodge

Friday, December 4th, 2009

Over the years Knight Inlet Lodge has been fortunate to receive many excellent photos from guests. We thought that you might enjoy seeing some of them. Many thanks to the numerous people that have sent us photos over the years. The grizzly bears of Knight Inlet Lodge make for some exciting photography opportunities as they fish for salmon or just hang out in the estuary.  Over time we intend to post more of these pictures on our blog as a way to let everyone see our bears in the wild. Here is few of my favourite photos, enjoy!

grizzly bear with bus

grizzly bear with bus

grizzly bear cub in boat

grizzly bear cub in boat

grizzly bear running in water

grizzly bear running in water